Uganda overhauls procurement rules to 'eliminate influence peddling'

Will Green is news editor of Supply Management
7 April 2014

☛ Want the latest procurement and supply chain news delivered straight to your inbox? Sign up for the Supply Management Daily 

8 April 2014 | Will Green

Government procurement regulations in Uganda have been revamped to support local businesses, speed up processes and "eliminate influence peddling”.

Under the changes bid evaluation teams will have to work to fixed time frames, and officials and ministers will not be allowed to bid for contracts with the government institution they are employed by or responsible for. A tribunal will also be established to handle complaints about the work of the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets Authority (PPDA).

The new regulations include preference schemes that give advantages to local suppliers when procuring goods, services and works. Some contracts will also be set aside for young people, women and people with disabilities.

Meanwhile, officials "shall not sign a contract whose contract price is above the market price of the product being procured" to "eliminate cases of the government paying ridiculously high prices for procurements".

Government bodies will be required to publish procurement plans, firms will be able to request information on unsuccessful bids, and in certain situations bidders will be allowed to submit a non-monetary “bid securing declaration” instead of using a costly bid security.

A PPDA spokesman said: “With 60 per cent to 70 per cent of the government budget being spent on public procurement and the public outcry against corruption and influence peddling, the law has been strengthened to limit who can provide services to government.”

The changes, which came into force in March, also include special provisions to enable faster and more efficient procurement of medicines and supplies for medical facilities.

The spokesman said: “The amendments will significantly change the way public procurement is managed in Uganda. Some of the immediate benefits are promotion of local businesses under the preference and reservation schemes, and efficiency in public procurement. The new law also demands great accountability from both public and private officials involved in procurement.” 

LATEST
JOBS
Cornwall
£37,191 - £44,697
Cornwall County Council
Hounslow, Heathrow /Richmond upon Thames
Competitive salary depending on experience plus generous share award
Tails.com
SEARCH JOBS
CIPS Knowledge
Find out more with CIPS Knowledge:
  • best practice insights
  • guidance
  • tools and templates
GO TO CIPS KNOWLEDGE