Half of top job seekers wouldn’t work for unethical employers

5 February 2016

Scandals such as unethical business practices and the use of slave labour are making job candidates much more selective about the employers they choose to work for.

A new report from The Institute of Environmental Management & Assessment (IEMA) found that over half of ‘prime’ candidates would refuse to work for employers with a record of such practices.

The study identified as prime candidates employees in their mid-thirties, with above average qualifications (45% having a Masters degree or doctorate). 

The practices include using slave labour, generating high levels of pollution, unsafe working conditions, poor environmental performance, questionable investments and unethical behaviour.

Over a third of these candidates were concerned about the negative impact that some industries and organisations have on the environment, according to the survey.

Many are actively seeking a career which is primarily “ethical” in nature. The study said that 90% of IEMA members who have moved into environmental careers claim high levels of satisfaction with their choice.

Those entering the profession come from a wide variety of backgrounds including finance, operations, marketing and communications and R&D.

Tim Balcon, CEO of IEMA, says: “With the economy becoming increasingly dependent on environment and sustainability skills, it’s great to see that many who boast these skills are enjoying their roles to such a high level.”

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