Wrangler's new dyeing process eliminates waste water

7 June 2019

Wrangler has launched a collection of denim which eliminates 100% of waste water in the dyeing process.

A new technique uses foam to replace vats of water and chemical baths which were conventionally required to dye yarn.

Wrangler said foam dyeing fabric ensured 100% of waste water is eliminated while energy use and waste are reduced by more than 60% compared with the usual process of dyeing denim.

Tom Waldron, VP & global brand president, Wrangler, said: “We’re proud to have helped pioneer a technology that has the potential to revolutionise sustainability standards for denim.

“The introduction of Indigood foam-dyed denim represents our continued commitment to use our global scale to advance the denim industry.”

The brand has also used recycled offcuts, which are spun into new yarn, to reduce the amount of new cotton required to manufacture its denim. Up to 28% of its fabric is made from recycled cotton.

Roian Atwood, director of sustainability at Wrangler, said: “Indigood raises the bar on what consumers can expect from us in terms of environmental performance.

“We are continuously looking for opportunities to improve the sustainable impact of our products from field to seam.”

Wrangler aims to conserve 5.5bn litres of water at its facilities by 2020 and source 100% sustainable cotton by 2025 as part of its wider sustainability goals.

Meanwhile a report by global alliance, the Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC), found no major global fashion brands could show that workers within their supply chains were paid a living wage outside of their headquarter countries.

While 85% of brands surveyed by the CCC had committed to ensure wages were enough to support workers’ basic needs, none of the brands put commitments into practice.

Anna Bryher, the report's author, said: “If brands are genuinely committed to paying a living wage, they should stop talking about it and just pay it. Pick a credible benchmark, tell suppliers, and raise prices accordingly.

“Start now with the 50 biggest suppliers and make the payroll records public to prove it is really happening. It’s not that complicated. Just pay people more money,” she added.

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