Huawei's deputy chairman Guo Ping has accused the US Congress of acting as “judge, jury and executioner” by putting the ban in place. © AFP/Getty Images
Huawei's deputy chairman Guo Ping has accused the US Congress of acting as “judge, jury and executioner” by putting the ban in place. © AFP/Getty Images

Huawei in legal battle with US government

13 March 2019

Chinese tech giant Huawei is suing the US government for banning the use of its products by federal agencies.

The firm’s deputy chairman Guo Ping has accused the US Congress of acting as “judge, jury and executioner” by putting the ban in place.

And the company is asking the US federal court to overturn Section 889 of the National Defense Authorization Act, which forbids government agencies from using Huawei equipment and services and stops them from contracting with or awarding grants or loans to third parties who do.

Its lawsuit was filed in Plano, Texas, where the firm has its US headquarters, last week. It argues that this part of the act violates the US Constitution by unfairly singling out an individual or group for punishment without trial.

The Trump administration claims that Huawei, the world's biggest maker of telecommunications equipment, poses a security threat. It is also pressuring allies not to buy Huawei equipment for the same reason and claims that the company would have no choice but to handover any information obtained via its equipment to the Chinese government if ordered to do so.

Ping said: "The US Congress has repeatedly failed to produce any evidence to support its restrictions on Huawei products. We are compelled to take this legal action as a proper and last resort."

He added: “This ban not only is unlawful, but also restricts Huawei from engaging in fair competition, ultimately harming US consumers. We look forward to the court's verdict, and trust that it will benefit both Huawei and the American people."

Song Liuping, Huawei's chief legal officer, said the disputed part of the act is based on “numerous false, unproven, and untested propositions.”

He commented: “Contrary to the statute's premise, Huawei is not owned, controlled, or influenced by the Chinese government. Moreover, Huawei has an excellent security record and program. No contrary evidence has been offered.”

The company also argued that the restrictions will impede efforts to improve the performance of 5G networks in the US and limit competition, resulting in consumers paying higher prices for inferior products.

Meanwhile, Huawei has released a Smart Logistics Solution, which aims to help businesses become more efficient in transportation, distribution, and warehousing.

The technology aims to support innovation in the logistics industry and will be based around the Huawei OceanConnect Internet of Things (IoT) Platform, NB-IoT, and radio-frequency identification technologies.

Cold chain transportation monitoring aims to improve safety and quality.
Sharing transportation containers improves logistics resources in last-mile delivery, complemented by greater efficiency through the the digital management of warehouses.

The new solution has already been deployed in factories and yards, and the software enables companies to digitally manage arrival and waiting times, as well as the time taken to load and unload suppliers’ vehicles.

It can improve unloading efficiency and the on-time delivery rate of suppliers, according to the Chinese firm.

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