The power to tackle 'black-cladding' is in buyers' hands

posted by Andrew Colley
22 July 2019

Purchasing professionals have been warned about the practice of “black-cladding” in Australian public procurement.

The practice typically involves non-indigenous businesses establishing dubious partnerships with indigenous interests in order to improve their chances of securing low-value Commonwealth contracts set aside under the Indigenous Procurement Policy (IPP), or artificially creating supplier entities to meet mandatory minimum indigenous participation requirements (MMRs) for higher value contracts.

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